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for coming and spending time with us. it does not matter what you did tonight if you do not get out and vote november 6. thank you for watching. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] >> our live road to the white house coverage continues tonight. first, at a 20 5:00 p.m. eastern, republican candidate mitt romney and his -- at 8:25 p.m. eastern, a republican candidate mitt romney and his wife at a rally. then, at 10:35 p.m. eastern, obama and bill clinton attend a rally. >> now joining us on the communicators this weekend before the election is fcc commissioner mimi on cyberporn mignon cyburn. if we could start with the events of the week. cellphone towers have been knocked out. people are using pay phones because their service is not working. what is your assessment of the carriers and their ability to maintain phone service for people in the area? >> first of a, allow me to thank you for allowing me to be here today. my condolences go out to the families. many of loved ones were lost in this tragic event. my condolen
, with the right leadership america is about to come roaring back. .. >> host: joining us on by "communicators" this week before the election is mignon cyburn, who after chairman genachowski it was the senior democrat on the federal communications commission. commissioner mignon cyburn, we could start with you. what has your assessment then, reports are up 25% of cell phone towers have been knocked out and people are now using payphones because the service is not working. what is your assessment of the carriers and their ability to maintain phone service for people in the affected areas of sandy. >> guest: thank you to the both both of you for allowing me to be there for you today. my condolences go out to the families. there are many loved ones lost in this tragic event. my condolences go out to them, and of course, my hats off to those brave people who continue to answer the call. in terms of the engagement, as you know, the german literally spent the night at the agency. our public safety% of the same. we are definitely engaged in the process that we have been working firsthand went as far
that there was a very large conspiracy, usually involving figures within the u.s. government, and a massive cover-up. >> this weekend on c-span3, 49 years later, the questions remain. lone gunman, the mob, the cia, castro. what happened in dallas? the assassination of john f. kennedy, 7:30 p.m. eastern and pacific. >> it was in 1982 that judge harold greene issued a decision which led to the breakup of the at&t corp.. that is our topic this week on the "communicators," the impact of that decision 30 years later on the telecommunications. joining us is professor roger noll of stanford, as well as professor jerry hausman of mit, both of whom were involved at various levels in the breakup or the decision to break up at&t. joining us in the washington studio is paul. professor noll, first of all, what with your activity during the breakup of at&t and what led to that decision? >> the antitrust case was formed during the johnson administration the late 1960's and a presidential task force called the telecommunications policy task force. it concluded the telecommunications industry, the part in federal
who chaired their respective parties' congressional campaign committees. >> host: and now joining us on "the communicators" this weekend before the election is fcc commissioner mignon clyburn who after chairman genachowski is the senior democrat on the federal communications commission. commissioner clyburn, if we could start with events of the week. >> guest: yes. >> host: hurricane sandy. >> guest: yes. >> host: um, what is your assessment? there have been reports that up to 25% of cell towers in the northeast have been knocked out, that people are now using pay phones because their service is not working. what is your assessment of the carriers and their ability to maintain phone service for people in these affected areas? >> guest: peter, first of all, allow me to thank you, the both of you, for allowing me to be here today. um, also, my condolences, of course, go out to the families. there are many loved ones who were lost in this, in this tragic event, so my condolences go out to them, and, of course, hats off to those brave first responders who answered, continue to answer the
communicators," the impact of that decision 30 years later on telecommunications. joining us in a round table discussion is professor roger noll of stanford, as well as professor jerry hausman of mit. both of these gentlemen were involved at various levels in the breakup or the decision to break up at&t. joining us here in our washington studio is paul barbagallo of bloomberg. professor noll, first of all, what was your role or activity during the breakup of at&t, and what led to that decision? >> guest: well, the roots of the antitrust case were in a presidential task force that was formed during the johnson administration in the late 1960s called the telecommunications policy task force. it had concluded that the telecommunications industry, at least the part of it that was in the federal jurisdiction, could be competitive and made recommendations both to the -- mainly to the federal communications commission about how to cause that to happen. then when the nixon administration came along, the holdover staff in the antitrust division after watching for a couple of years decided to pursue an
in satellite trucks to use satellite to back call the information, -- back haul the information, using generators, using batteries to keep the network up and running. >> about emergency communications? >> from our perspective, the public safety ports, very few of them went down. they had a nice backup power in place. they were consolidated. we saw that 911 worked well. the mayor's office in new york city talked about, use text in were of you can. leave the phone calls to 911, the really important calls. otherwise use text in order data connections to gather information. >> did it get flooded with information? >> usage was pretty tremendous. whenever you have an issue where there is a lot of people who need information, you find that the networks get flooded. i saw the numbers up to 15,000% increase on some websites. in a lot of the applications stores, the apps that ran to the top or ones that give access information, or the mobil flashlight. -- mobile flashlight. there was a surge in traffic, but i did not see numbers that suggested there was a significant amount of call blocking or d
. and in instances where they could, they brought in satellite trucks to actually use satellite to backhaul the information, avoiding -- where it was necessary, avoiding the land line networks and using satellite. using generators, using batteries to really try and keep the network up and running. >> host: now, what about b emergency communications? how were they affected? >> guest: the psaps, the public safety answering points, the folks who field 911 calls, very few of them went down. they're sort of consolidated so they don't have a lot of areas that they have to really protect. so we saw that 911 worked well, and i think the mayor's office in new york city talked about, boy, use text where you can. i think that's a good message to deliver to consumers. use texting wherever you can, leave the phone calls to 911, to the really important calls. and otherwise use texting or use your data connections to gather information. >> host: did the spectrum get flooded with information and overloading? >> guest: sure. their, i mean, usage was pretty tremendous, and we found this out wherever you have
in place. in instances where they could, they brought in satellite trucks actually use and avoid satellites and keep the network up and running. >> host: how did they affect the interoperability. >> guest: there were two steps. very few of them went down. they had a nice backup power and plays, they consolidated so they didn't have a lot of areas that they really had to protect. so we saw that it worked well. i think that the mayor's office talked about send text messages when you can. use text messaging whenever you can. otherwise, use texting for your data connection to gather information. >> host: of the spectrum get flooded with information and overloading? >> we found this out whenever you have an issue where there is a lot of people who need information. you find that the networks really get flooded. i saw up to 15,000 increases on some websites. and a lot of the applications, those that gave the access information, or the mobile flashlight. we saw a lot of people downloading it. i didn't see numbers that suggested that there was a significant amount of called walking were dropping. i
cellular spectrum, which the fcc had given us, or should we let the others have it and mckenzie productive as of the year 2000, there would be 1 million users with cellular telephones. except it was off by 99 million. there were actually about 100 million cellular subscribers in the year 2000. that fundamentally changed the world. they basically gave up the ghost by letting go of cellular. long long-distance has ceased to be a separate business. there are always people arguing in washington. but if you actually look, the latest government statistics are 32% of the people don't even have landline telephones anymore. they use cell phones. the competition out there, in terms of the internet. 4-g is coming in. i would be willing to predict that in 10 or 15 years, the majority of youth on the internet will be over mobile phones and cell phones throughout the world. >> host: if you expand that to wireless devices so you don't limit it to cell phones -- >> guest: that's what i mean. tablets, you name it, exactly. >> host: i think the really important point about your question is that the mindset
-spanc-span2. .. >> and middle east policy. well, joining us this week on "the communicators" is jeff gardner who has a couple of titles. number one, he's chairman of a group called u.s. telecom, and he's also president and ceo of the windstream corporation. mr. gardner, first of all, tell us what u.s. telecom is and what you represent. >> guest: well, we represent the telephone companies in the united states of america from the very biggest -- seizen, at&t -- to some of the very smallest. and what we try to do is really get together as a group, put together ideas so that we can really take care of our consumers in a better way. >> host: so when you talk about the small telephone companies, how many are there out here in the united states now? >> guest: there's thousands of telephone companies in the u.s. still, and so there's been plenty of consolidation, but there's still a lot of very small telephone companies. we have from verizon to small companies that are co-ops even involved in united states telephone association today. so still many different business issues as a part of that. we all
>> host: joining us this week on "the communicators" is jeff gardner is chairman of the u.s. telecom and president and ceo of the windsupreme corporation. tell us what u.s. telecom is and who you represent. >> guest: we remit the tornado - telephone companies in the united states from at and t to the shallest, and we put together ideas to take care of our consumers in a better way. >> host: how many are there here in the united states now? >> guest: there's thousands of telephone companies in the u.s. still. there's been consolidation, but there's a lot of small telephone companies. we have from verizon to small companies that are co-ops involved in the united states telephone association today. still, many different business issues as a part of that. we all try to work together to refuel solve common issues. that's what the whole purpose of the association is. >> host: we want to get into the policy issues in a minute, but first of all, what is windstream p >> guest: it's a wonderful company. i may be biased in that review, but we're mainly focused in rural america providin
. he's chairman of us telecom and c.e.o. of the wind stream corporation. tell us what us telecom is and who you represent. >> we represent the telephone companies in the united states from the biggest to the smaller. we try to get together as a group and put together ideas so we can take care of our consumers in a better way. >> when you talk about the small telephone companies how many are there in the united states now? >> there are thousands of telephone companies in the united states still. there's been plenty of consolidation but there are still many companies. from verizon and our co-ops in the association today. so still many different business issues as a part of that. we all try to work together to solve common issues. that's what the whole purpose of the association is. >> we want to get into some of those policy issues in just a minute but what is wind stream? >> wind stream is a wonderful company. i may be buy ased in that review. we are in the triple play if you will, voice brond band, we are rural. we have stretch from new mexico all the way to up state new york ser
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12